world-shaker:

One of my favorite teachers told me once that he dressed the way that he did — jackets, ties, and other business attire — because he wanted us to know that, while he was our teacher, he was not our friend.

And I thought that made sense. It was his job to advocate for us. To challenge us. To help us be the best we could be. And so he wasn’t our friend. He was our teacher. To keep those ideas separate, he used his dress. I think that’s worth remembering as we move more and more of our work as teachers into online spaces.

Very interesting write-up over here on this issue. If you reblog, weigh in on your thoughts. I’d be curious to see if you think teachers should friend their students.

Such a touchy topic. Should teachers “friend” students? If so, what are the fine lines that should not be crossed? 

(via world-shaker-deactivated2013092)

Last year, Pakistan blocked Facebook over a group called “Draw Muhammad Day” which held a competition on the social networking site that had people submitting drawings of Prophet Muhammad. Visual depictions of Prophet Muhammad are against Islamic law and Pakistan subsequently banned Facebook for a short period of time because they felt the actions were blasphemous. The “2nd Annual Draw Muhammad Day” was created back in May (which has since been removed from Facebook) and Pakistan has once again blocked users from accessing the social network.

Jessie Walkup is a woman in her early 20’s living in Bellevue, Kentucky. An avid social media user, Jessie enjoys catching up with friends on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

Recently, Jessie’s world was turned upside-down when someone created a ‘hate page’ on Facebook with Jessie as its sole target. The creator of the page has been posting mean-spirited comments about Jessie for months, focusing on her physical appearance.

Jessie has been deeply hurt by the page’s vicious attacks and is pleading with users who initially ‘like’-d the page to ‘unlike’ it in hopes that this will finally convince Facebook to remove it. So far she has been unsuccessful.

This is Jessie’s story.

Notice some suspicious activity on your wall? Well there some simple security settings built into Facebook – some of these settings are new while others have been around for some time – that should help you quickly detect if any other person is secretly logging into and using your Facebook account.

facebook account usage

Go to Facebook.com -> Account -> Account Settings -> Account Security. Here you’ll see a list of all computers and mobile devices that have logged into your Facebook account and when. You can also see the approximate geographic location of the device, based on the IP address, that was used to access your Facebook account.

Great Advice!! 

(via world-shaker-deactivated2013092)

world-shaker:

The Truth About Facebook
via the always good Doghouse Diaries

This is funny, but also mostly true. 

world-shaker:

The Truth About Facebook

via the always good Doghouse Diaries

This is funny, but also mostly true. 

(via world-shaker-deactivated2013092)

infoneer-pulse:

In the past we’ve warned about the importance of keeping an eye on which Facebook apps have access to your account. In future, that will be all the more important as Facebook has announced that it now lets developers access your phone number and address, if they choose, when you use their apps.

It’s worth noting that Facebook is only making this data available if you specifically approve it – apps you’ve already approved won’t have automatic access to the information. So, next time you install a Facebook app, look out for the “Access my contact information: Current Address and Mobile Phone Number” permission request.

» via The Next Web

One of the most important reasons why you should always think twice before approving apps on Facebook. 

(via world-shaker-deactivated2013092)

world-shaker:

This is an important case. What are your thoughts?

A buck doesn’t go a long way these days, but it’s probably the best dollar Katie Evans has ever earned.

The Pembroke Pines Charter High School grad is celebrating the end of a two-year battle over her first amendment rights that started when she declared her AP English teacher, Sarah Phelps, “the worst she ever had” on her Facebook page. The school cried cyberbullying and suspended Evans.

But the University of Florida student fought back, with the help of the ACLU, arguing that her statements were protected by the first amendment. She sued school principal Peter Bayer in 2008, and Bayer’s attempt to have the case thrown out earlier this year was rejected by a judge, who stated that Evans’ speech fell under the umbrella of protected speech.

Last week, instead of gearing up for a trial, Evans learned that a settlement had been reached, the Miami Herald reported. She will receive $15,000 for attorney’s fees and $1 in nominal damages. More importantly, though, all records of the incident will be removed from her school file.

Oh, and my favorite part of this whole story:

On the website ratemyteachers.com, Phelps received a 3.9 out of 5.0, with the option to “like” the rating on Facebook.

(via world-shaker-deactivated2013092)

twitterlive:

StumbleUpon traffic passes Facebook - Bizjournals.com http://bit.ly/gefFyP socialmedia

That is quite the feat, considering the virtual size and reach of Facebook. 

(via musingsofamaniac)